Curriculum Vitae

Home Expert Witness Forensic Research Engineering Consultant Curriculum Vitae

—— NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY (BS-1957 and MS-1961)

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN (PhD-1966) ——


ENGINEERING EDUCATION OF DR. MIHOLITS
 ALSO SECURITY CLEARANCES, LICENSES & PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Education ─ BS (1957) and MS (1961) from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois (BS major in civil engineering ─ MS major in civil and sanitary engineering) PhD (1966) from the University of Texas at Austin [(1) major in civil, sanitary and environmental health engineering; and (2) additional studies and research in the radiobiology and radiochemistry fields].

University Experience — Instructor at the University of Texas at Austin (1965-66) while completing doctorate Assistant Professor at San Jose State University, California (1966-68) and Assistant Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (1968-70).

Public Service — commissioned in the U.S. Public Health Service in 1964 (inactive reserve; 1964 1998). Commissioned final rank ─ Commander (O-5).

Professional engineering licenses — civil engineering licenses were obtained in the states of Texas in 1967 and New York in 1970 (currently inactive by choice). California license was obtained in 1976 (license #C-26711) and expires on 03/31/2014.

Security clearances — DOE-Q (Top-Secret) (1976-1984 and 1991-1996) and DOD-Secret (1972-1973).

Significant professional organizations — Life Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).


Photos and illustrations: (1) Northwestern University; (2) University of Texas at Austin; (3) Uranium Enrichment Plant at the DOE-Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and (4) Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Facility

SECTION 2
DR. MIHOLITS' CURRICULUM VITAE WAS RESTRUCTURED IN 2006.
 THE REASON BEING THAT HE TOOK HIS 30 YEARS OF HIGH-PROFILE ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE AND  
 DIRECTED IT
SOLELY
TO THE SPECIALTY OF SERVING AS AN EXPERT WITNESS CONSULTANT.
THE MATERIAL THAT FOLLOWS REFLECTS HIS ABILITY TO PROVIDE EXPERT WITNESS SERVICES.


In 1965, Dr. Miholits commenced working on high-profile engineering projects that had significant failure, accident and risk potentials. Examples of these projects include: civil and environmental engineering: nuclear fuel cycle engineering; health & safety; hazardous waste; ionizing radiation; and related areas.

In 1984, Dr. Miholits formed Miholits Engineers and offered engineering consulting services on the aforementioned high-profile projects.

Dr. Miholits' training and experience on high-profile projects was unique. Why? Because these projects also had a significantly high potential for failures and accidents and the follow-on litigation phase. This created an opportunity for Dr. Miholits to apply his high-profile project experience and problem solving skills to the needs of the legal profession.

With this background, in 2006, he redirected his engineering consulting business so he could capitalize on his experience strengths, talents and abilities in the role of Expert Witness Engineering Consultant. This meant that he could assist the legal profession for those engineering facilities that had failures or accidents within his area of expertise. For these situations, he could assist the legal profession in the following ways.

  • Forensic research to locate information related to engineering failures and accidents.
  • Analyzing and evaluating this information base and then developing the evidence base so the attorneys can develop their legal arguments.
  • Provide expert witness services in the form of depositions and court testimony.
  • Develop proactive solutions to engineering and science problems.

Based on the aforementioned business scope of the present Miholits Engineers Company (2006), the Curriculum Vitae that follows was designed to present the education and work experience of Dr. Miholits that is specifically applicable to expert witness nuclear activities and the associated litigation support work.

In preparation for Expert Witness work, he has engaged in two major nuclear projects that are important to this field. They are listed below. The services provided from 1965-2006 that formed the basis for his credentials to do litigation support and expert witness consulting are contained in Sections 4 through 7 of this web-page.
  • Expert Witness Consultant: this is a new consulting subject area. It came into being because many forms of engineering consulting work can develop into a litigation risk. Therefore, he provides assistance to the legal community. The engineering areas are the same as those presented in the High-Profile Projects sections of these Curriculum Vitae.

  • Forensic Research Consultant supports the expert witness activity.

  • Engineering Consultant: this activity supports the expert witness activity. This consulting subject area was restructured so the total emphasis of his Proactive Engineering Consulting work is now on engineering projects with a litigation risk, (e.g., nuclear fuel cycle, civil engineering, etc.). These projects have the potential to generate legal problems. These engineering projects have been defined as one which has the potential to create environmental, radiation, nuclear risks, medical, health and safety problems. This in turn, can cause social, political, regulatory and legal issues to develop.

This expansion in work scope permits him to be more effective as a consultant.

In this document, he describes his qualifications to do this work. But most importantly, he describes: (1) the education and broad experience he brings to these consulting projects; and (2) the special skills and techniques he brings to literature search and research projects. This is discussed in more detail in other sections of this website.

How did Dr. Miholits get started dealing with engineering projects with litigation risks?

  • He has been in the health-related specialty of sanitary and environmental engineering since his first university Co-op job in 1954 (Northwestern University and the City of Chicago).

    • Then in 1963, he added the issues related to the nuclear field, as he used radioisotopes in his Ph.D. research work at the University of Texas at Austin. Because of this auspicious career start, his ability to deal with these kinds of projects from a well-informed basis increased quite-a-bit over the past half century.

    • Because he was engaged in a health-related specialty, he received a commission in the U.S. Public Health Service (inactive reserve) in 1964 and subsequently attained the rank of Commander (O-5).

    • He entered the nuclear area in 1975 while at the Bechtel Corporation.

  • He continued to work in engineering areas with a litigation risk potential from 1954 and continued through the next half-century.

  • Engineering projects with an enhanced litigation risk potential are defined as: (1) nuclear fuel cycle projects (e.g., uranium enrichment, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, decontamination of nuclear power plants, nuclear waste repositories, nuclear waste transport, spent fuel storage, etc.); (2) civil engineering projects (e.g., construction of chemical refiners, sanitary waste facilities, landfill sites, etc.); and (3) et cetera. All of these and others can create environmental health and safety problems, etc.

  • These problem areas are defined as: areas they raise controversial issues. These issues may be social, political, environmental, health and safety, esthetic, legal, violation of regulations, etc. He formally lists the credible experience period as 1965-2010.

Summary: this summary describes how Dr. Miholits got introduced or involved with high-profile engineering projects which in-turn have a significantly high litigation risk potential. These projects are presented below in Sections 4 and 5  This lead-in section also describes the specific skills, talents and abilities which Dr. Miholits possesses which in turn allows him to be effective in these high-profile project areas.

TYPICAL HIGH-PROFILE PROJECTS
IN SCIENCE and ENGINEERING FROM 1965 -2010

—— ORNL-GDP — PROJECT AREAS — TMI-2 —— 


SECTION 3
DR. MIHOLITS' WORK EXPERIENCE (1965 to 2010)
ON HIGH-PROFILE CIVIL AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING PROJECTS


Sections 4-6 present supporting information on the experience of Dr. Miholits from 1965 to 2010. The experience presented has been limited to that applicable to the consulting services provided by Miholits Engineers.

  • Section 4 discusses engineering and science experience which was gained through his engineering consulting business (i.e., Miholits Engineers - 1984-2010).

  • Section 5 discusses supporting engineering and science experience gained through working for engineering-construction companies and universities (1965-1984).
  • Section 6 contains a list of his fifteen publications (1959-2010).
  • Section 7 contains a descriptive list of about one-hundred proprietary reports he prepared for Kaiser Engineers, Bechtel Corporation and as owner of Miholits Engineers (1970-2010).

Through these sections, Dr. Miholits has described how his current business was formed. He then describes the project experience he gained which is applicable to his current business.


SECTION 4
MIHOLITS ENGINEERS (1984-2006) ENGINEERING CONSULTANT
MIHOLITS ENGINEERS (2006-2010) EXPERT WITNESS CONSULTANT
Dr. Miholits has been an engineering consultant on high-profile engineering projects with a significant litigation risk potential from 1984-2010.
Dr. Miholits is the owner and sole-proprietor of Miholits Engineers. From 1984-2010, he divided his efforts between business development work and consulting in the civil and nuclear fuel cycle engineering areas. The project experiences listed below are a partial list of the project management and technical work he did on these projects from 1984-2010.
  • Civil projects with environmental health and safety (EH&S), sanitary and regulatory considerations.
    These projects also have physical and biological concerns.
    • Conducted a field study of the alleged movement of alleged hazardous materials through the groundwater system under major Silicone Valley companies in the Sunnyvale, CA area.
    • Performed a series of studies at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, S.C. relative to releases of pollutants to the atmosphere.
    • Served as a civil engineering project manager at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Menlo Park, CA. The work included design and construction management of new and/or upgraded SLAC facilities. All activities related to this type of project were under his purview and included: (1) project planning; (2) civil and structural design calculations and design sketches: (3) supervision of drawings prepared via CAD; (4) working with outside design consultants; (5) management of staff and outside contractors on construction projects; (6) working with SLAC’s purchasing department re: procurement activities; and (7) anything else that came up.
    • Performed environmental work such as: permit applications, environmental reports and a wide-range of issues in these broad areas. This included federal and state regulatory work.
       
  • Nuclear projects with radiological health and safety concerns. Examples (power, nuclear fuel cycle, waste, transportation, etc.).
    These projects have both safety and radiation risks. Additionally, these kinds of projects also have significant environmental, regulatory, physical, biological and medical concerns. A list of representative projects follow.
    • Prepared on the order of 30 percent of the "Instructions and procedures for use by the scientists and engineers" who prepare the safety analysis reports (SAR) for each applicable nuclear and non-nuclear facility at the DOE-Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C.
    • Prepared sections of safety analysis reports (SAR) for engineering-construction companies for nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities.
    • Performed radiation risk analysis calculations for specific operations in various nuclear facilities.
    • Performed studies on nuclear and mixed waste projects, as it applied to handling, treatment and disposal activities.

SECTION 5
EARLY HIGH-PROFILE PROJECT EXPERIENCE PLUS
ENGINEERING-CONSTRUCTION AND UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE (1965-1984)
The project experiences listed below on high-profile engineering projects is a partial list of the technical work Dr. Miholits performed on engineering projects with a significant litigation risk potential.

Dr. Miholits began his literature search activities in earnest in 1963 when he started his dissertation research. This continued while he was a university faculty member from 1965 to 1970 where he taught in the civil, sanitary and radiological health engineering areas. And these literature search activities have continued to date.

From 1970 to 1973, he was a civil/sanitary engineer with Kaiser Engineers. From 1973 to 1984 he was with the Bechtel Corporation where he divided his time between three major subject areas: (1) civil engineering projects; (2) nuclear fuel cycle engineering projects; and (3) environmental and regulatory compliance work for the civil and nuclear fuel cycle projects. A partial list of representative projects in these two areas include:

  • Civil projects with environmental health and safety (EH&S), sanitary and regulatory considerations. These projects also have physical, biological and medical concerns.
    • University faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin, San Jose State University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, respectively in the areas of civil and sanitary engineering.
    • Conducted a study of the biological environment in the South San Francisco Bay.
    • Conducted a detailed feasibility study which considered the advantages and disadvantages (i.e., cost, resources, emissions, etc.) of using a massive system of large mirrors to generate electricity in a sun-rich, warm climate area in eastern California.  
    • Participated in a physical study (included water sampling and analysis) on the biological environment for the entire length of the Truckee River in Nevada.
  • Nuclear projects with radiological health and safety concerns. Examples (power, nuclear fuel cycle, waste, transportation, etc.). These projects have safety and radiation risks, as well as significant environmental, regulatory, physical, biological and medical concerns. Work included management and technical work.
    • Prepared sections of SARs for nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities.
    • Developed the initial decontamination and cleanup methodology after the TMI-2 nuclear incident in Harrisburg, PA on March 28, 1979 (see photo 4 above on right of TMI).
    • Performed radiation risk analyses for specific operations in a nuclear facility.
    • Task manager and project manager for the development of a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) methodology to be used to evaluate the design of a nuclear waste repository 2,000 feet below the surface of the earth in a bedded salt deposit. This was to ensure that the above-ground, shaft and below-ground systems were safe for the workers during the construction and operation phases. Then he supervised a team which used this methodology to evaluate the design (Carlsbad, New Mexico).
    • Project engineering manager for the initial 1976 siting studies for a deep (2,000 feet) nuclear waste repository program in bedded salt (western state) and domed salt deposits (3 southeastern states), (OWI/ONWI).
    • Project engineering manager for the preparation of conceptual and preliminary nuclear waste repository designs (ONWI)
    • Project engineering manager for the nuclear cleanup program (FUSRAP and SFMP) throughout the United States which resulted from the initial days of the atomic energy program (1940).
    • Performed the initial design studies for a uranium enrichment plant (Dotham, Alabama) as it applied to wastes (hazardous, nuclear and mixed), environmental and regulatory concerns (see photo 3 above on left of the ORNL-GDP).
    • Performed studies on nuclear and mixed waste projects, as it applied to handling, treatment and disposal activities.
    • Conducted complex effluent analysis calculations for an AGNS-type nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.
    • Performed a detailed analysis of the 10CFR regulations as they applied to deep (2,000 feet or more) repositories for high-level spent fuel and other nuclear wastes.

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SECTION  6 - PUBLICATIONS

List of Books

    1. "New Developments in the Anaerobic Digestion of Sludge," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), published as a chapter in "Advances in Water Quality Improvement, Water Resources Symposium #1," E.F. Gloyna and W.W. Eckenfelder, Editors, the University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas, pgs 355-79, (1968).

    2. "Sludge Processing Technology," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), published as part of Chapter 6 in "Municipal Sewage Sludge Management: a Reference Text on Processing, Utilization and Disposal," Second Edition, Volume IV, Water Quality Management Library, No. 4, Library Editors: W.W. Eckenfelder, J.F. Malina, Jr., J.W. Patterson, Pgs 255-403, (1998). 

     

List of Sixteen Publications

    1. "Research and Development of a New Method of Waste Disposal for Isolated Sites in the Arctic, Part I, Fundamentals of Sanitary Waste Incineration," Master's Thesis, Northwestern University, (5/61).

    2. "Research and Development of a New Method of Waste Disposal for Isolated Sites in the Arctic, Part I, Fundamentals of Sanitary Waste Incineration," (Internal Report #AAL-TR-61-9, also as Government Report #AD- 274900), Arctic Aero-Medical Lab, Fort Wainwright Alaska, 112 pages, (5/61).

    3. "Aerobic Cell Yield and Theoretical Oxygen Demand," (with W.O. Pipes and O.C. Boyle), Proceedings of the 18th Purdue Industrial Waste Conference, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana, pg. 418-426 (5/63).

    4. "Uptake and Utilization of Amino Acids in an Anaerobic Digester," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), the University of Texas at Austin, Technical Report to the Water Supply and Pollution Control Division, U.S. Public Health Service, (Report #EHE-11-6505; CRWR-11), Austin, Texas (11/65).

    5. "Uptake and Utilization of Amino Acids in an Anaerobic Digester," Doctoral Dissertation, the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas (1/66).

    6. "Microbial Stabilization of Wastewater Sludge," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), 48th Annual Water and Sewage Works Association Short School and Texas Water Pollution Control Association Seminar, Conference Proceedings, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas (3/66).

    7. "New Developments in the Anaerobic Digestion of Sludge," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), Special Lecture Series on Advances in Water Quality Improvement, Conference Report, the University of Texas @ Austin (4/66).

    8. "New Developments in the Anaerobic Digestion of Sludge," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), published as a chapter in "Advances in Water Quality Improvement, Water Resources Symposium #1," E.F. Gloyna and W.W. Eckenfelder, Editors, the University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas, pgs 355-79, (1968).

    9. "Chemostat Design: Low Capacity, Aerobic, Sterile Feed Systems for Continuous Microbial Cultures," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), American Association of Professors of Sanitary Engineering, Workshop Notebook, the University of Texas @ Austin, (6/66).

    10. "Application of Manometric, Chromatographic and Radioisotope Techniques to Anaerobic Sludge Digestion," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), American Association of Professors of Sanitary Engineering, Workshop Notebook, the University of Texas @ Austin, (6/66).

    11. "Effects of Amino Acids on Anaerobic Digestion," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), Journal, Water Pollution Control Federation, Research Supplement (2/68).

    12. Advances in Water Quality Improvement, Water Resources Symposium, 1968, Edited by Earnest F. Gloyna and Wesley Eckenfelder, Chapter entitled, New Developments in the Anaerobic Digestion of Sludges by Joseph F. Malina, Jr. and Ernest M. Miholits, the University of Texas, (pages 355-379). 

    13. "An Integrated Refuse/Incinerator/Desalting Facility," Results of Study for the City of San Diego, Waste Age Magazine (6/74).

    14. "Implementation of Area-wide Refuse Operations," published in the Conference Proceedings of the 4th Annual Solid Waste Symposium (3/68).

    15. New Directions in the Anaerobic Digestion of Sludges by Malina, J. F. and Miholits, E. M., Process Design Manual for Sludge Treatment and Disposal, EPA-625/1-79/011 (9/79).

    16. "Sludge Processing Technology," (with J.F. Malina, Jr.), published as part of Chapter 6 in "Municipal Sewage Sludge Management: a Reference Text on Processing, Utilization and Disposal," Second Edition, Volume IV, Water Quality Management Library, No. 4, Library Editors: W.W. Eckenfelder, J.F. Malina, Jr., J.W. Patterson, Pgs 255-403, (1998). 

 

 

List of Eleven Presentations at Conferences, Et Cetera

    1. "Effects of Amino Acids on Anaerobic Digestion of Sludge," presented at the 39th Annual Conference, Water Pollution Control Federation, Kansas City, Missouri (9/66) (one of the featured speakers with an audience of about 1,000).

    2. "Protection from the Effects of Nuclear Weapons, Shelter Design, and the Shelter Environment," presented at the 1968 New York State, Civil Defense Commission Directors Conference, Albany, New York (10/68) (one of the featured speakers with an audience of about 1,000).

    3. "Fallout Shelter Analysis and Environmental Engineering," over 50 lectures for the Department of Defense, Office of Civil Defense Program in the California cities of: Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose, Castro Valley, San Rafael and Los Angeles (1966-68). Trained engineers in the areas of: (1) nuclear fission theory; (2) defining what ionizing radiation is, how it works, why it is good or bad, et cetera; (3) biological effects of ionizing radiation; (4) shielding theory; and (5) the control of the shelter environment.

    4. "Global Strategy between the Super Powers Relative to the Use and Effects of Nuclear Weapons," TV interview, Albany, New York (4/68).

    5. "Protection from the Effects of Nuclear Weapons," presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Rensselaer Chapter of the Society of Sigma Xi, Troy, New York (4/68).

    6. "Solid Waste Management for Port Terminal Operations and Waterfront Industries," presented at the 1971 International Plant Engineers Conference, Anaheim, California, (1971).

    7. "Handling of Hospital Solid Wastes," presented to Kaiser Foundation Medical Care Program (1972).

    8. "Implementation of Area-Wide Refuse Operations," presented at 4th Annual Solid Waste Symposium (3/72).

    9. "Understanding Nuclear Fears," seminar series, more than a dozen presentations since 1980. Seminars were geared towards presenting an accurate coverage of the nuclear topic.

    10. "The Pros and Cons of the Strategic Defense Initiative Program." Guest seminar speaker with dozens of presentations since 1985.

    11. "Dealing with Hazardous Material Incidents as It Relates to US Coast Guard Reserve Personnel Dealing with Incidents." This was a training course presented to in excess of 200 Coast Guard reserve personnel stationed at the Coast Guard Island (Alameda, California) in the year 1985.

Partial List of Three Major Proposal Presentations over 10 Million Dollars

    1. Examples of two successful proposal write-ups and interviews to the Department if Energy (both are in 1980 dollars).

      A $9.6 million-2 year in-house engineering contract for engineering and environmental work on the DOE/OWI-ONWI job, and

      A $75 million-5 year contract for design engineering, environmental and nuclear waste work on the DOE/FUSRAP-SFMP program.

    2. Another example of a proposal interview was one made to the Department of Energy for a $75 million-5 year contract project at the Idaho National Energy Laboratory (1991). The team was not selected as the winner though I believe we were the best team.

    3. Numerous in-house presentations to Bechtel's senior managers and vice presidents re: program and project status; environmental, regulatory, and waste advise as it applies to nuclear and non-nuclear jobs.

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SECTION 7

UNPUBLISHED PROPRIETARY REPORTS

 

On the order of one-hundred unpublished proprietary reports, papers, proposals and other documents from 1970 to date while I was with Kaiser Engineers (1970-73), Bechtel Corporation (1973-85) and Miholits Engineers (1985-2010). The approximate title of each report and a summary description of the most significant elements contained in each of these reports is presented in a detailed resume which is not included.

As such, these unpublished proprietary reports are listed by subject areas for Kaiser Engineers, Bechtel Corporation and Miholits Engineers, respectively.

It should be noted that because of the presentation technique used, the same report may be listed under two or more skill areas if the report contains material applicable to more than one skill area. It is my belief that this form of duplication of material can only add to the clarity of the presentation, rather than vice versa. I say this because one can then clearly see what a person has done in each work skill area rather than being faced with determining whether or not one's experience is applicable to other subject areas.

Additionally, it should be noted that each report also describes a job accomplishment in 41 different nuclear, civil and environmental engineering skill areas.

Additionally, it should be noted that an unpublished proprietary Kaiser, Bechtel or Miholits report does not have to be a 100-200 page document. Rather, it will be whatever length, style or what-have-you that was deemed necessary by the Client to convey the desired message and/or documentation in a written form.

 

 

    Kaiser Engineers [ 1970 - 1973 ]

    1. An Integrated Refuse/Incinerator/Desalting Facility. Study for the City of San Diego, CA. The purpose was to destroy the refuse by incineration and then reclaim the heat produced to convert the seawater to fresh water.

    2. Implementation of Area-Wide Refuse Operations. Study report to determine the feasibility of using a former Kaiser sand and gravel pit as a repository for refuse.

 

 

    Bechtel Corporation [ 1973 - 1984 ]

    1. Nuclear waste process design engineering work.

      Report describing the preliminary engineering work re: radwaste, other process waste streams, plus all of the environmental work on Bechtel's private entry into the uranium enrichment business (UEP). Encompassed a $500,000 up-front environmental effort over two years on a $1 billion plant plus the supporting three-1,200 MWe nuclear reactors. This would have created the world's largest environmental complex when completed in the mid-1980s.

      Report resulting from an evaluation of the chemical processes at the Savannah River Defense Nuclear Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) relative to nuclear wastes. Recommended chemical process changes. Included the evaluation of all aspects of the chemical process associated with the vitrification of nuclear waste material prior to its final state in a borosilicate glass matrix.

      Report resulting from an evaluation of the chemical process used to separate out the usable radioactive elements from the balance of the high-level nuclear elements in spent fuel rods in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant (unbuilt AGNS-type plant). Recommended chemical process changes.

      Report describing chemical process system proposed to minimize the amount of waste uranium, alone and with other radwaste streams from a gaseous diffusion-type uranium enrichment plant (UEP).

      Report based on the analysis of published data to determine the content, concentration, specific activity, etc., of each of the radioactive elements in the effluent and waste streams of an AGNS-type nuclear fuel reprocessing plant for the country of Japan. This was a comprehensive analysis of these streams in order to assist other engineers in their quest to improve the nuclear fuel reprocessing process and at the same time lessen the problems associated with the effluent and waste streams.

    2. Nuclear waste repository siting studies.

      Reports describing conceptual and preliminary-level engineering and environmental work on the DOE/ONWI $20 million - 5 year program dealing with the identification and selection of deep (2,000 feet) disposal sites for high-level wastes. Constructed cost estimate= $2 billion. To date it has not been located, designed or built because of legal and environmental complications.

      Report based on the review and subsequent evaluation document of the US-NRC's technical criteria (10CFR61) for the siting and disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. Done for Japan.

    3. Nuclear waste repository/facility conceptual and detailed design.

      Reports describing the development of the radwaste criteria applicable to the design of: (1) the Defense Nuclear Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at duPont's Savannah River Plant; (2) the Recycle/Assembly Facility addition to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (RA); and (3) the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) in Oak Ridge [for the reprocessing of fast reactor spent fuels].

      Report describing a critical design verification engineering analysis followed by the preparation of a failure modes and effects analysis document for a $2 billion repository for defense nuclear wastes (DOE/WIPP project). Analysis ensured that all equipment and structures were designed with adequate backup safety systems. This includes: mechanical, nuclear, electrical, chemical and all other engineered systems, as well as environmental and health-related systems. Additionally, the civil and structural design of this geological system was analyzed. End result: the system was proven to be safe to all people in the construction and operational phases. Construction completed in 1988. Non-operating to-date because of legal and environmental complications.

      Report describing a conceptual reference repository design (CRRD) effort for a commercial high-level nuclear waste repository in bedded or domed salt deposits. This design was intended to be conceptual in scope as: (1) detailed geological information was not available at this stage; and (2) the design was to deal with the size and layout of the repository from the standpoint of storage requirements, heat load requirements, vehicle movement and related design factors.

    4. Hazardous, nuclear and mixed-waste management work; RI/FS work; remediation designs; technology evaluations and special process designs; and process designs to minimize the amount of waste.

      Reports describing remedial investigations/feasibility studies (RI/FS), remedial (conceptual and detailed-level engineering design), waste management, and environmental work on DOE/FUSRAP-SFMP $75 million- five 5 year program dealing with the clean-up of hazardous waste, radwaste and mixed-waste. Reports included a design document describing a 200,000 cy surface repository for hazardous and low-level wastes which included: (1) a bottom system and walls of low permeability clay; (2) a redundant plastic liner system; (3) drainage and pumping system; and (4) other engineered features.

      Reports (multiple) addressing the following issues on the DOE/FUSRAP-SFMP $75 million -5 year program for the clean-up of hazardous waste, radwaste and mixed-waste. Issues included: RI/FS work; remedial design (corrective action conceptual and detailed-level engineering design); waste management (single site vs nationwide approach); transportation; and environmental work.

      Reports to the DOE addressing cleanup, restoration and environmental protection programs at the Savannah River Site.

    5. Nuclear decontamination activities.

      Report describing the total waste management plan for the decontamination of TMI-2, This included the methodology to be used for the decontamination of the TMI reactor system after the 1979 incident. The issues included the radionuclides to be removed, the hazardous chemicals used as the decontamination agents, the radio- and non-radioactive hazards, and the methods to safely handle, treat, transport and dispose of the resultant hazardous chemicals consisting of a radio- and non-radioactive chemical mixture.

      Report describing the methodology used to identify the physical, chemical and radiological characteristics of the radionuclides and other hazardous chemicals to be stored in a multitude of types of containers, vessels and/or other types of structures. Researched, evaluated and recommended technologies to determine the physical and structural integrity of these containers/structures. Included theoretical projections on their physical lifetime (ONWI, WIPP).

      Report that summarized the results of evaluation of existing technologies which could be applicable for the treatment, isolation, destruction and/or disposal of radioactive chemicals and wastes.

      In-house staff guidance document describing the available technologies which can be used for the treatment, handling, concentration, immobilization, transportation, disposal, et cetera of radioactive waste to ensure that cost-effective, state-of-the-art and accepted techniques are used and they are in compliance with EPA, DOE, NRC and other applicable regulations.

    6. Health physics and radiation protection activities.

      Report describing the WIPP design to ensure that the design met the worker's health and safety requirements during the construction and operation phases. Also was required to meet all of DOE's design standards.

      Report describing the waste management plan for the TMI decontamination project. This plan provided for adequate health and safety features for all of the workers engaged in decontamination activities.

    7. Nuclear transportation studies.

      Report that presented a comprehensive nation-wide theoretical analysis for the collection, treatment, consolidation, packaging, transport, short-term disposal and long-term disposal of all of the nuclear waste from all of the nuclear power plants, DOE reservations and other sources in the United States. As no approved nuclear waste repository exists today (not even WIPP), for the purposes of this study assumptions had to be made as to the possible location of this long-term repository.

    8. Radiological and environmental health, industrial health and safety activities.

      Report describing the results of an evaluation of the WIPP design (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). Purpose of the evaluation was to ensure that it met the worker's health and safety requirements during the construction and operation phases. Also was required to meet all of DOE's design standards. In this regard, directed the engineering analysis and preparation of a failure modes and effects analysis on a $2 billion repository for defense nuclear wastes (DOE/WIPP project).

      Analysis ensured that all equipment and structures were designed with adequate backup safety systems. This includes: mechanical, nuclear, electrical, chemical and all other engineered systems, as well as environmental and health-related systems. Additionally, the civil and structural design of this geological system was analyzed. End result: the system was proven to be safe to all people in the construction and operational phases. Construction completed in 1988. Non-operating to-date because of legal and environmental complications.

      Report describing the methodology for the decontamination of the TMI reactor system after the 1979 incident. The issues included the radionuclides to be removed, the hazardous chemicals used as the decontamination agents, the radio- and non-radioactive hazards, and the methods to safely handle, treat, transport and dispose of the resultant hazardous chemical mixture. And as part of this activity, developed the overall waste management plan. This plan included adequate health, safety and radiological protection for the workers involved in the decontamination activity.

    9. Nuclear measurement and monitoring programs.

      Reports resulting from work with hydrogeologists and groundwater modelers re: the movement of hazardous chemicals (radio- and non-radioactive) through a geological media (DOE projects: ONWI, WIPP, FUSRAP-SFMP), as well as the design to prevent and/or reduce the rate of movement of chemicals.

      Reports resulting from work with hydrogeologists for remedial action project planning, conceptual and detailed remediation design (FUSRAP-SFMP, SRS).

      Report resulting from work with hydrogeologists and groundwater modelers to ensure that bedded- and domed-salt deposits will provide long-term (at least 50,000 years) storage characteristics in compliance with regulatory requirements (ONWI).

    10. Auditing activities on nuclear projects to ensure compliance with environmental health and safety standards.

      Audit reports, documents, and/or notes associated with my work were generated while I served in the role of technical manager and/or project engineer. Here, my responsibility was to control the quality of work through various auditing procedures that included, but was not limited to developing the appropriate documents in the following areas: work plans, scope of work, schedule, manpower needs and loading, critical paths, task descriptions and work assignments, etc.

    11. Risk analysis in a nuclear environment: a failure modes and effects analysis program.

      Report described the results of an engineering analysis. A failure modes and effects analysis document was prepared for a $2 billion repository for defense nuclear wastes (DOE/WIPP project). Analysis ensured that all equipment and structures were designed with adequate backup safety systems. This includes: mechanical, nuclear, electrical, chemical and all other engineered systems, as well as environmental and health-related systems. Additionally, the civil and structural design of this geological system was analyzed. End result: the system was proven to be safe to all people in the construction and operational phases. Construction completed in 1988. Non-operating to-date because of legal and environmental complications.

    12. Hydrogeology and groundwater modeling for nuclear waste projects.

      Reports resulting from work with hydrogeologists and groundwater modelers re: the movement of hazardous chemicals (radio- and non-radioactive) through a geological media (ONWI, WIPP, FUSRAP-SFMP), as well as the design to prevent and/or reduce the rate of movement of chemicals.

      Reports resulting from work with hydrogeologists for remedial action project planning, conceptual and detailed remediation (corrective action) design (FUSRAP-SFMP, SRS).

      Report resulting from work with hydrogeologists and groundwater modelers to ensure that bedded- and domed-salt deposits will provide long-term (at least 50,000 years) storage characteristics in compliance with regulatory requirements (ONWI).

      Reports resulting from work done by a team of engineers relative to locating and identifying the radionuclides, and then defining their concentration profile in a vertical and horizontal direction. These radionuclides resulted from Manhattan project experiments. This applied to a number of FUSRAP and SFMP sites (e.g., Niagara Falls Storage Site and the Weldon Springs Site). This remedial investigation (RI) was needed to properly define the remedial (RA) phase.

    13. Federal 10CFR activities.

      Report presenting the results of a comprehensive review of NRC's technical criteria (10CFR61) for the siting and disposal of high-level nuclear wastes for Japan.

    14. Environmental documentation activities.

      Reports based on preliminary engineering work that dealt with radwaste, other process waste streams, plus all of the environmental work on Bechtel's private entry into the uranium enrichment business (UEP). Encompassed a $800,000 up-front environmental effort over two years on a $1.5 billion plant plus the supporting three-1,200 MWe nuclear reactors ($3.5 billion) [total of $5.0 billion in 1990 dollars]. This would have created the world's largest environmental complex when completed in the mid-1980s. Unconstructed because of political reasons.

      Series of siting reports beginning with 1,000 square mile area and finishing with 10 square mile areas during my tenure on the project. This OWI/ONWI program was for the siting of a repository for commercial high-level nuclear wastes in a deep (2,000 feet) disposal site in salt. This program had two major parts: (1) the engineering phase; and (2) the siting i.e., environmental) phase. The environmental phase consisted of many interrelated subject areas, including the use of the following types of people: land use planners; demographers; biologists; chemists; hydrogeologists; groundwater modelers; meteorologists; surface and groundwater hydrologists; and engineers.

      Series of environmental documents for the FUSRAP-SFMP project on various topics of interest and concern. As the engineering manager for this project, I was responsible for the RI/FS (remedial investigations and feasibility studies from an engineering standpoint, as well as remedial (corrective action conceptual and detailed-level engineering design), waste management, and environmental work for this DOE/FUSRAP-SFMP $75 million - 5 year program dealing with the clean-up of hazardous waste, radwaste and mixed-waste.

      Reports based on the staff's field environmental activities for the ONWI and uranium enrichment projects. Includes, but is not limited to: archeology, land use, biological systems, etc.

      Report summarizing my review and evaluation of an environmental report for the Allied Gulf Nuclear Services (AGNS) nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

      Environmental review report of NRC's technical criteria (10CFR61) for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes.

      Environmental review report associated with my computation of the content, concentration, specific activity, etc., of each of the radioactive elements in the effluent and waste streams of an AGNS-type nuclear fuel reprocessing plant for the country of Japan. This was a comprehensive analysis of these streams in order to assist other engineers in their quest to improve the nuclear fuel reprocessing process and at the same time lessen the problems associated with the effluent and waste streams.

      Environmental documentation/reports for many other projects ranging from $10,000 studies to very large constructed cost projects.

    15. Staff training programs.

      Reports associated with the training of staff on each project to ensure that the staff was effective in carrying out the scope of work effectively, within budget and on schedule. At the same time, the staff was trained to properly consider the environmental, safety, regulatory and other concerns highlighted in all seventeen items addressed in section II.

    16. Senior-Level, Executive information exchange programs.

      Reports such as, in-house Bechtel papers, reports, position papers and related documents. Example: a proprietary position paper, as it applies to the direction the Company should take on a nuclear project as it applies to environmental, health and safety, radiation protection, health physics and regulatory issues (1973-85).

    17. Sanitary, municipal and industrial waste treatment process design and engineering. Also water treatment process design and detailed engineering.

      Process documents for the water and non-nuclear sanitary and industrial waste streams on nuclear facility projects (e.g., uranium enrichment plant).

Sixty Four Percent-Point of Curriculum Vitae Page

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      Miholits Engineers [ 1984 - 2010 ]

    1. Hazardous waste management work; RI/FS work; remediation designs (corrective action); technology evaluations and special process designs; and process designs to minimize the amount of hazardous waste.

      Reports describing remedial investigations/feasibility studies (RI/FS), remedial (conceptual and detailed-level engineering design), waste management, and environmental work on DOE/FUSRAP-SFMP $75 million- five 5 year program dealing with the clean-up of hazardous waste, radwaste and mixed-waste. Included the design of a 200,000 cy surface repository for hazardous and low-level wastes which included: (1) a bottom system and walls of low permeability clay; (2) a redundant plastic liner system; (3) drainage and pumping system; and (4) other engineered features.

      In-house reports describing the remediation activities undertaken at Teledyne McCormick Selph (Hollister, CA) re: the cleanup and/or isolation of hazardous materials that inadvertently entered the underground system. Wastes included those chemicals associated with the manufacture of military ordnance including solvents and complex organic compounds.

      In-house documents that develop the program and implementation thereof re: the hazardous material and waste management plans for the complex issues at an ordnance manufacturing facility. This included a groundwater monitoring, sampling and analysis program.

      Report that summarized the results of the evaluation of existing technology, as well as systems in the production stage, which could be applicable for the treatment, isolation, destruction and/or disposal of hazardous chemicals and wastes.

      In-house report or reference document which provides guidance to staff re: the technology to be used for hazardous waste to ensure that cost-effective, state-of-the-art and accepted techniques are used and they are in compliance with EPA regulations.

      Reports dealing with inputs to DOE cleanup, restoration and environmental protection programs at the Savannah River Site.

    2. RCRA/CERCLA program activities.

      Reports generated from a groundwater sampling program designed to determine the extent of the movement of specific chemicals through a groundwater system. These chemicals resulted from the manufacturer of ordnance for military aircraft.

      Updated application material for a RCRA Part B permit re: a waste characterization plan for military ordnance.

      Report to California's Department of Health Services (DOHS) relative to closing a surface impoundment facility. Called a closure plan.

      Documents containing the hazardous waste/material information needed by the attorneys for Teledyne McCormick Selph (Hollister, CA) relative to a suit brought by the State of California's Attorney General's Office on behalf of the Department of Health Services. The suit was against the manufacturer of military ordnance. The ordnance was used to operate the ejection seat and cockpit canopy prior to a pilot's emergency ejection.

      Data base document. Developed and maintained a data base document for hazardous materials and wastes in accordance with California's Title 22 (equivalent to RCRA).

    3. Groundwater modeling activities. Groundwater and surface water sampling, monitoring and measurement programs.

      Report resulting in a groundwater sampling program that was designed to determine the extent of the movement of specific chemicals through a groundwater system. This resulted from the manufacturer of military ordnance. Directed an effluent monitoring program for a manufacturer of military ordnance. Supervised the preparation of the quarterly and yearly effluent monitoring reports.

      Document presenting the results of technical evaluations of groundwater modeling reports used in legal proceedings (Colorado area).

    4. Sanitary, municipal and industrial waste treatment process design and engineering. Also water treatment process design and detailed engineering.

      Reports presenting the results of the development of waste management plans for a variety of small, point discharges of sanitary wastes from homes and a multitude of different industrial waste types (e.g., plating, laundry, cannery, dairy, meat-packing, slaughterhouse and other wastes).

      Process documents describing the process designs, configurement, size and associated equipment needed to deal with a multitude of small, point discharges of industrial wastes, including but not limited to: plating, laundry, cannery, dairy, meat-packing and slaughterhouse wastes.

      Process documents describing other water issues, as well as other non-nuclear sanitary and industrial waste streams on other projects.

      In-house documents for projects undertaken at the South District Water Treatment Plant and two water pumping stations in the City of Chicago.

      Report re: a process to reclaim the usable heat from San Diego's refuse to provide the energy to desalt seawater and to create fresh drinking water.

      Design reports re: process engineering and structural analysis work for all of the custom designs undertaken by a manufacturer of small, package-type wastewater treatment units (Los Angeles).

      Input documents re: maintenance practices for a water and wastewater utility (EBMUD).

    5. Regulatory area: federal 40CFR Part 260-280 (RCRA) and California Title 22 work.

      Report dealing with the DOE's request for a variance from EPA's land disposal restrictions on both a site-specific and nation-wide basis; and DOE's strategy document re: the National Compliance Plan.

      Comment reports re: responses to all other federal and state regulations applicable and appropriate to DOE sites. Example: the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC.

      Report dealing with identifying training requirements and needs for DOE staff in the environmental, radiological, safety and hazardous waste areas at the SRS.

      Report consisting of comprehensive instructions and guidelines for the preparers of safety analysis reports for non-reactor nuclear facilities. These instructions were prepared to ensure compliance with the regulations and the need to make informed decisions. This includes the subject areas of: emergency preparedness, quality assurance; radiation protection; industrial protection; industrial hygiene; and the site description chapter.

      Report addressing a closure plan for the closing of a surface impoundment in accordance with California's Title 22 and the federal 40 CFR (Part 260-280) RCRA requirements.

      Updated permit application re: the needed data and other material for a RCRA Part B permit for a waste characterization plan for a military ordnance facility.

      Permit applications for a number of California agencies, including the Department of Fish and Game, the Air Resources Control Board and the California Water Quality Control Board on behalf of a military ordnance facility.

      Transportation manifests for the disposal of hazardous wastes from a military ordnance facility.

      Data base document. Includes the development and maintenance of a data base for hazardous materials and wastes in accordance with California's Title 22 for a military ordnance facility.

      Toxic release report (SARA 313) for a military ordnance facility.

      Documentation for the company attorneys in response to the California DOHS alleger 1987/88 environmental/hazardous waste violations [40 CFR (RCRA) and California's Title 22] on the site of a major defense manufacturing complex. Good response resulted in a more favorable settlement contract with the California Attorney General's Office and the DOHS. Prepared for and conducted what was a good June 1989 DOHS inspection. The 1989 fine was "Zero Dollars."

      This included: the correction of over thirty alleged RCRA and California's Title 22 hazardous waste and environmental violations purported by the California DOHS. Subsequently, prepared the manufacturing facility for a follow-on DOHS inspection that resulted in no violations.

      Document containing the procedures which will ensure that waste destruction and disposal activities was properly controlled and within regulatory standards at a military ordnance facility.

      In-house document containing an operating system which ensures that senior management in the company has the means to keep the company in regulatory compliance at a military ordnance facility.

      Other regulatory compliance documentation.

    6. Environmental documentation activities .

      Environmental reports for dozens of other projects ranging from $10,000 studies to projects with a constructed cost over $2 billion.

      Reports pertaining to new inputs to environmental impact statements for nuclear facilities.

      Report addressing the environmental and engineering issues associated with the release of 100 mgd of wastewater to the San Francisco Bay from Santa Clara County.

      Environmental documentation material for dozens of projects ranging from $10,000 non-nuclear studies to nuclear projects with a constructed cost of over $2 billion.

      In-house environmental procedures for a manufacturer of military ordnance. Example: conducted a program to determine the radiation exposure of workers who were using high-energy X-ray equipment to ensure adequate quality control of metals used at this facility.

      Toxic release report (SARA 313) for a manufacturer of military ordnance.

      Permit applications for a number of California agencies, such as the Department of Fish and Game, the Air Resources Control Board and the California Water Quality Control Board.

    7. Environmental health, industrial health and safety activities.

      Reports that address or otherwise show the results of many environmental health and safety (EH&S) programs and activities.

        Report re: development of safety procedures to ensure that the risk to field workers engaged in hazardous waste clean-up, destruction and disposal activities was minimal, properly controlled and within regulatory standards. Developed a training program for the staff re: hazardous waste handling, treatment and disposal techniques, regulatory matters and related areas.

        Report re: development of safety, handling and operational procedures to ensure that the risk to the staff of an ordnance manufacturing facility was properly controlled and within regulatory standards. Prepared a training program for the manufacturing, research and chemical operations staff re: the use of the Hazard Communication Standard.

        Report re: upgrading an existing emergency planning and response program. Implemented this program at a military ordnance facility. Trained a hazardous material emergency response spill team.

        Report re: a hazardous material/waste emergency response spill team at a chemical and ordnance manufacturing complex (e.g., after the 10/19/89 earthquake). Developed a hazards communication standards program to ensure employee's health and safety.

        Report re: the services I provided to the US Coast Guard (12th District) re: training their staff to be effective in handling hazardous waste incidents.

        Report re: a program to determine the radiation exposure of workers engaged in using high-energy X-ray equipment for the quality control of metals.

      Report re: the development of comprehensive instructions and guidelines for the preparers of safety analysis reports for non-reactor nuclear facilities. These instructions were prepared to ensure compliance with the regulations and the need to make informed decisions. This includes the subject areas of: emergency preparedness, quality assurance; radiation protection; industrial safety protection; and industrial hygiene protection.

    8. Structural engineering design work (Comanche Peak).

      Report summarizing the results of my technical quality review exercise relative to the design of the structural support beams in the reactor building of the new Comanche Peak- Unit 2 nuclear power reactor (Dallas, TX). This was done while a Consultant to ABB Impell and ABB Government Services. Herein, a technical quality review is defined as: "A design verification process to determine the correctness, accuracy, chain of custody and completeness of each and every aspect of the structural engineering analysis work from the first calculation in 1976 through the final design work in 1992."

    9. Nuclear facility support services (oversight services provided to the DOE-SR while a consultant to NUS Corporation re: the operation of the Savannah River Site.

      Comment reports were prepared for the DOE before they were released to the Client (Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). Reports were associated with the review and, evaluation of information re: the operation of the site by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). These included, but was not limited to: SRS operational plans; reports dealing with annual air emissions, surface and groundwater monitoring programs, and health physics and radiation monitoring programs; dose assessment software programs; and uranium in the site's environment. Provided an interpretation of the resultant data.

      Report reporting the results of a review, evaluation and ultimately recommendations re: DOE's request for a variance from EPA's land disposal restrictions on both a site-specific and nation-wide basis; and DOE's strategy document re: the National Compliance Plan.

      Report describing the results of a review and evaluation of a number of DOE-SRS technical reports. Example: a program for the replacement of a high-level waste evaporator.

      Report that identified training requirements and needs for DOE staff in the environmental, radiological, safety and hazardous waste areas at the SRS.

      Report that identified and developed an environmental surveillance plan and a hazardous material incident reporting system for the DOE-Savannah River Site.

      Report containing the inputs to the development of soil, air, surface water and groundwater monitoring programs, specifically as it applies to the presence of radionuclides.

      Report containing guidance to the DOE at the beginning of their projects to ensure that a clear and proper direction is taken in accordance with the needs of the operator (WSRC) of the SRS.

      Report containing inputs to DOE's cleanup, restoration and environmental protection programs at the Savannah River Site. This included guidance relative to: (1) the engineering techniques with the potential for the effective removal/retrieval of radionuclides and other hazardous-type chemicals from the underground environment and hydrogeological system; (2) the engineering techniques available for the immobilization of the radionuclides in the subsurface environment; (3) the safeguards systems and methodologies needed for characterizing, monitoring and accounting for the radionuclides remaining after the retrieval operation has been completed; (4) the procedures that the DOE need to implement to ensure that the cleanup operation proceeds in accordance with the specified regulations and standards; and (5) numerous other related activities that should be associated with a well-thought out cleanup, restoration and environmental protection program.

      Report consisting of comprehensive instructions and guidelines for the preparers of safety analysis reports for non-reactor nuclear facilities. These instructions were prepared to ensure compliance with the regulations and the need to make informed decisions. This includes the subject areas of: emergency preparedness, quality assurance; radiation protection; industrial protection; industrial hygiene; and the site description chapter.

    10. Nuclear decontamination activities.

      Reports describing the development of the methodology for the identification of the physical, chemical and radiological characteristics of the radionuclides and other hazardous chemicals stored and/or otherwise present in a multitude of types of container vessels or other types of structures. Researched, evaluated and recommended technologies to determine the physical and structural integrity of these containers/structures. Included theoretical projections on their physical lifetime (Westinghouse-HANFORD).

    11. Health physics and radiation protection activities.

      In-house document describing a program to determine the radiation exposure of workers who were using high-energy X-ray equipment to ensure adequate quality control of metals used at this facility.

    12. Nuclear measurement and monitoring programs.

      Report re: reviewed and evaluated Westinghouse Savannah River Company and DOE-SR reports for the Savannah River Site (SRS). These included, but were not limited to: SRS operational plans; reports dealing with annual air emissions, surface and groundwater monitoring programs, and health physics and radiation monitoring programs; dose assessment software programs; and uranium in the site's environment. Provided an interpretation of the resultant data.

      Report re: developed an environmental surveillance plan and a hazardous material incident reporting system for the DOE-Savannah River Site.

      Report re: provided inputs to the development of soil, air, surface water and groundwater monitoring programs, specifically as it applies to the presence of radionuclides.

      Report re: developed a groundwater monitoring and measurement program at Teledyne to provide the documentation that Teledyne is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. This program extended to: measuring the levels of radiation received by the staff because of the use of equipment used to evaluate the integrity of aircraft metals; and the presence of specific chemicals in air and water streams.

      Report re: developed an environmental surveillance plan and a hazardous material incident reporting system for the Savannah River Site.

    13. Auditing activities on nuclear projects to ensure compliance with environmental health and safety standards.

      Report consisting of the review, evaluation and with guidance on: DOE-SRS generated reports with respect to the topic of ensuring compliance with environmental health and safety standards.

      Report describing the necessary training requirements and needs for DOE staff in the environmental, radiological, safety and hazardous waste areas at the SRS.

      Report addressing the results of auditing activities for the manufacturing work activities at Teledyne. Reason: to ensure that the company was in compliance with the radiation protection and environmental, health and safety program established for the company.

      Report consisting of audit results re: the structural design of the supporting beams in the reactor building for the Comanche Peak Unit 2 nuclear power plant this year. Herein, audited means that I reviewed the analysis methodology and the associated calculations for technical correctness and accuracy.

    14. Skills developed in a DOE/NRC-type operational work environment.

      Reports developed in accordance with my role as a full-time consultant to the Halliburton NUS Environmental Corporation. In this role, he provided guidance to the managers and staff of the Aiken, Savannah River office; the Houston, TX office; and the corporate office in Gaithersburg, MD. Examples of reports which portray the range and diversity of these nuclear/environmental services are depicted by the work accomplishments listed below.

        Reviewed, evaluated and provided inputs to the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and DOE-SR reports for the Savannah River Site (SRS). These included, but were not limited to: SRS operational plans; reports dealing with annual air emissions, surface and groundwater monitoring programs, and health physics and radiation monitoring programs; dose assessment software programs; and uranium in the site's environment. Provided an interpretation of the resultant data.

        Reviewed, evaluated and provided guidance on: DOE's request for a variance from EPA's land disposal restrictions on both a site-specific and nation-wide basis; and DOE's strategy document re: the National Compliance Plan.

        Reviewed and evaluated DOE/SRS technical reports. Example: a program for the replacement of a high-level waste evaporator.

        Interpreted and responded to all other federal and state regulations applicable and appropriate to DOE sites. Example: the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC.

        Reviewed and prepared new inputs to environmental impact statements for nuclear facilities.

        Identified training requirements and needs for DOE staff in the environmental, radiological, safety and hazardous waste areas at the SRS.

        Developed an environmental surveillance plan and a hazardous material incident reporting system for SRS.

        Provided inputs to the development of soil, air, surface water and groundwater monitoring programs, specifically as it applies to the presence of radionuclides.

        Reviewed reports and provided comments before their release to the Client.

        Provided guidance at the beginning of projects to ensure that a clear and proper direction is taken in accordance with the needs of the Client.

        Reviewed, designed, developed and prepared other work products in the environmental compliance area.

        Prepared inputs to DOE cleanup, restoration and environmental protection programs at the DOE-SRS.

        Developed comprehensive instructions and guidelines for the preparers of safety analysis reports for non-reactor nuclear facilities. These instructions were prepared to ensure compliance with the regulations and the need to make informed decisions. This includes the subject areas of: emergency preparedness, quality assurance; radiation protection; industrial protection; and industrial hygiene.

        Assisted in the preparation of proposals for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), DOE/FERNALD, plus many others.

        Performed other engineering and environmental support work, as required.

    15. Emergency preparedness program.

      Report containing a comprehensive set of instructions and guidelines to allow the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to prepare a emergency preparedness program for presentation in a safety analysis report for Savannah River Site and subsequent implementation.

    16. Quality assurance program.

Report consisted of a comprehensive set of instructions and guidelines to allow the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to prepare a quality assurance program for presentation in a safety analysis report for the Savannah River Site and subsequent implementation.

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